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ALL MOTORS OF RENDER ARE COOL

Arnold? Redshitf? Octane?

Greatest of all

Let’s take the render by the horns. There is no such thing as a perfect rendering engine. What we can say is that there is a perfect engine for a particular 3D scene or 3D motion project. And that’s where we’re going to start.

The truth is that we at Kutuko don’t like to lecture too much. It’s not about not getting caught up in the superiority of Redshift, Arnold, Octane or V-Ray, but about leaving behind that Manichean vision of what is 100% good or 100% bad, and making the most of the potential of each software to achieve the desired creative excellence in our projects.

And what better way to convey what advantages we see in Arnold, Octane or Redshift than to show you which projects we have used with 4D Cinema for each of these engines and tell you the best they have brought us.

The desperate and expected updates

Before we get into other topics, we must take into account that, as it happens in other types of software, the universe of rendering engines is 100% alive. This means that you can’t settle for using a particular engine for a type of project, because updates of the different engines may offer you better Octane or Redshift solutions in the short term for those renderings you were using Arnold on And vice versa.

Maybe it’s a little exhausting. But it keeps you awake, in touch with the latest stuff to get a better or more optimized result in terms of time and resource consumption.

But let’s go into the subject a little bit and see the strengths and weaknesses of each of the render engines.

Arnold: High standard in everything, quality and resource consumption

But it’s not just CPU that Arnold lives by. Currently there is a version of Arnold on GPUs that is still in Beta. However, the results that are being obtained so far are not very conclusive in terms of its operation and benefits.

Here comes the catch, which is the same that appears when we talk about any CPU rendering engine: the important initial investment you must make to start beating the copper with Arnold. The costs of a graphics card are significantly lower than those of a processor and we must also take this into account.

To put the basic figures in black on white: the cost of an intermediate Nvidia GeForce graphics card can be around 550 euros, while a processor with the necessary power to work well with Arnold, such as an Intel Core i9 with 12 cores, is around 1,200 euros. You can do the calculations yourself.

But it’s not just CPU that Arnold lives by. Currently there is a version of Arnold on GPUs that is still in Beta. However, the results that are being obtained so far are not very conclusive in terms of its operation and benefits.

Here comes the catch, which is the same that appears when we talk about any CPU rendering engine: the important initial investment you must make to start beating the copper with Arnold. The costs of a graphics card are significantly lower than those of a processor and we must also take this into account.

To put the basic figures in black on white: the cost of an intermediate Nvidia GeForce graphics card can be around 550 euros, while a processor with the necessary power to work well with Arnold, such as an Intel Core i9 with 12 cores, is around 1,200 euros. You can do the calculations yourself.

Arnold is perhaps the best quality rendering engine available, but it is also the most demanding for your computer. Its renders are CPU based and, if you don’t want to die waiting for it to export each one of your frames, you’d better get a good machine (with its corresponding economic outlay)

More stuff. Arnold uses a node system to work with materials, something that allows you a lot of possibilities that will bring out your crazy side and lab with tests that seem impossible.

Kutuko Arnold project:

MeduxFlywith Data.

In the case of this spectacular 3D motion video for a telecommunications network measurement company, what Arnold brought us was the versatility and quality of the lighting treatment of the scenes and the butterfly. Arnold offers very interesting and flexible settings to make the light follow an object (in this case, the light had to follow the butterfly that had quite complex movements). In addition, Arnold’s light decay is superior to Redshift’s, allowing for realistic and effective gameplay with little configuration effort.

Redshift: Agility and versatility at the service of your render

Redshift, al igual que Arnold, también tiene sus fans que no paran de crecer. Seguramente, lo que más mola de Redshift es su agilidad tanto a la hora de trabajar como en los tiempos de render (un punto clave cuando gestionas varios proyectos de videos 3d simultáneamente como nos pasa a nosotros).

En Kutuko llevamos un año aproximadamente utilizando Redshift para un número importante de nuestros proyectos. Supuso un cambio relevante a nivel de equipos informáticos, ya que tuvimos que reforzar las tarjetas gráficas de algunas máquinas para empezar a trabajar con cierta consistencia con este motor de render basado en GPU.

Redshift, like Arnold, also has its growing fans. Surely, what is coolest about Redshift is its agility both at the time of work and in the times of rendering (a key point when you manage several 3d video projects simultaneously as it happens to us).

At Kutuko we have been using Redshift for about a year for a significant number of our projects. This was a significant change at the team level, as we had to reinforce the graphics cards in some machines to start working with some consistency with this GPU-based rendering engine.

One of the most interesting advantages of Redshift when working in Cinema 4D is that it allows you to take advantage of some tricks in our favourite 3D video program, such as making sure that a light source in a scene doesn’t affect a particular object, something that, for example, Octane doesn’t allow.

Redshift’s weaknesses with respect to Octane and Arnold? Perhaps the quality of the finishes depending on the type of scene and materials. But the truth is that the results are quite close to the optimum levels of Octane and Arnold, so the decision between efficiency and maximum quality depends on the 3D artist or studio he is working in.

Kutuko Redshift Project: For F1 Ident content.

CHANNEL VAMOS OF MOVISTAR.

One of the great advantages that Redshift gave us in this project was that it allowed us to exclude objects from the lighting and play with them in an agile way so that the light did not affect any element that we wanted to show in a different way. It was especially interesting because, as you can see in the video, the graphic line was based on two chromatic tones and two types of lights. Redshift allowed us to quickly decide and apply which of the two lights we wanted to use on each element. Redshift in this sense made it much easier for us than if we had worked on Octane, for example.

Octane: Realism in its purest form

Like Redshift, Octane is a rendering engine that works with the GPU, your machine’s graphics card. It is a versatile rendering software that you can use with 4D Cinema and that offers you the advantage of NOT having to go through test after test to see how the render would look, thanks to its progressive rendering system. Also, by far, it is the one with the best integrated displacement maps.

We can find the problem of using normal maps or bump because Octane generates artifacts and, besides, there are some tricks of 4D Cinema that are not compatible with this engine… but if you pull a GPU with at least 3GB of RAM dedicated only to render, you will get a very interesting performance.

Kutuko Octane Project:

3D BODEGONS

In this project that we are about to take out of the oven (and of which we still can’t tell you much more) Octane is giving us a photo-realistic dose that is especially interesting when you show real objects like a sneaker, a plant or a coffee maker. In addition, it is an internal project in which we have to adjust the dedication as much as possible and, in that sense, Octane, with its progressive rendering, gives us the agility we need to make the project efficient at the level of dedication with a spectacular result.

Yes to all rendering engines.

Let’s not fool ourselves; I’m sure that even before reading this post you already had your favorite render engine. Or maybe if you’re just starting, this article has given you some hints to start cranking Arnold, Redshift or Octane. In any case, as we have told you, at Kutuko we love working with the 3 of them. Although it is also true that each one of our designers and 3D motiongrapher has their own tastes and hobbies… and that’s how it should be.

If you get the chance, try all three engines or even one more, find your own style and discover the tool you are most comfortable with.

We work to make things cooler every day and you have to enjoy everything you can while doing it. You know what we say in Kutuko:

#VisualisWonderful.

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